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Cotton vs glass?
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Pcm81 Offline
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Post: #1
Cotton vs glass?
Been watching a bunch of vaping videos, trying to educate myself on the subject. And I have to ask: Has anyone tried using the glass wool in place of the cotton in RDAs? In chemistry we use glass wool as filter for very corrosive liquids or reducing agents like KMnO4. Just seems like a more resilient and less likely to burn material than cotton...

What yal thinkin?
(This post was last modified: 13-04-2019 03:12 AM by Pcm81.)
13-04-2019 02:53 AM
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paulS Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(13-04-2019 02:53 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  Been watching a bunch of vaping videos, trying to educate myself on the subject. And I have to ask: Has anyone tried using the glass wool in place of the cotton in RDAs? In chemistry we use glass wool as filter for very corrosive liquids or reducing agents like KMnO4. Just seems like a more resilient and less likely to burn material than cotton...

What yal thinkin?

There is silica wicking. That is the Closest there has been. It has issues. Silica – not cotton – tused to be the most popular wick material for vaping. This is in thje pre-subohm era. Silica is even more neutral in flavor than cotton, and burning a silica wick is impossible at temperatures that a vaping device can reach. Since they don’t burn, silica wicks are extremely long lasting. Cotton ultimately overtook silica in popularity, though, for two reasons. The first is that silica isn’t easy to work with initially. Howeever once you get the hanfg odf it it is easy peasy. You can’t squish silica between your fingers as you can cotton, so you can’t thread a silica wick through a coil; you have to wrap the coil around the wick. Silica also doesn’t transport e-liquid quite as efficiently as cotton. If you use a silica wick for sub-ohm vaping, you’ll have to wait between puffs to let the wick re-saturate. While a silica wick isn’t a good choice for chain vaping, it’s worth considering if you prefer lower-temperature vaping, want the purest flavor possible or simply want a wick that can last an incredibly long time. So for thoise using a single coil atomizer at below 18 watts or so, it is a very good choice.

It is worth mentioning that Silica must be amorphous and not crystalline.
We don't want Silicosis.

There is thread that explains all the different types of wicks
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Thread-Wha...ilica+wick

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13-04-2019 02:36 PM
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Pcm81 Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(13-04-2019 02:36 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:53 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  Been watching a bunch of vaping videos, trying to educate myself on the subject. And I have to ask: Has anyone tried using the glass wool in place of the cotton in RDAs? In chemistry we use glass wool as filter for very corrosive liquids or reducing agents like KMnO4. Just seems like a more resilient and less likely to burn material than cotton...

What yal thinkin?

There is silica wicking. That is the Closest there has been. It has issues. Silica – not cotton – tused to be the most popular wick material for vaping. This is in thje pre-subohm era. Silica is even more neutral in flavor than cotton, and burning a silica wick is impossible at temperatures that a vaping device can reach. Since they don’t burn, silica wicks are extremely long lasting. Cotton ultimately overtook silica in popularity, though, for two reasons. The first is that silica isn’t easy to work with initially. Howeever once you get the hanfg odf it it is easy peasy. You can’t squish silica between your fingers as you can cotton, so you can’t thread a silica wick through a coil; you have to wrap the coil around the wick. Silica also doesn’t transport e-liquid quite as efficiently as cotton. If you use a silica wick for sub-ohm vaping, you’ll have to wait between puffs to let the wick re-saturate. While a silica wick isn’t a good choice for chain vaping, it’s worth considering if you prefer lower-temperature vaping, want the purest flavor possible or simply want a wick that can last an incredibly long time. So for thoise using a single coil atomizer at below 18 watts or so, it is a very good choice.

It is worth mentioning that Silica must be amorphous and not crystalline.
We don't want Silicosis.

There is thread that explains all the different types of wicks
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Thread-Wha...ilica+wick

Silica wick is not what i had in mind. I was thinking about glass wool.
Something like this:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-28-Grams-Py...0677.m4598
Silica wick seems like much thicker fibers. I have glass wool that is 6 micron fiber diameter...
13-04-2019 09:50 PM
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paulS Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(13-04-2019 09:50 PM)Pcm81 Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:36 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:53 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  Been watching a bunch of vaping videos, trying to educate myself on the subject. And I have to ask: Has anyone tried using the glass wool in place of the cotton in RDAs? In chemistry we use glass wool as filter for very corrosive liquids or reducing agents like KMnO4. Just seems like a more resilient and less likely to burn material than cotton...

What yal thinkin?

There is silica wicking. That is the Closest there has been. It has issues. Silica – not cotton – tused to be the most popular wick material for vaping. This is in thje pre-subohm era. Silica is even more neutral in flavor than cotton, and burning a silica wick is impossible at temperatures that a vaping device can reach. Since they don’t burn, silica wicks are extremely long lasting. Cotton ultimately overtook silica in popularity, though, for two reasons. The first is that silica isn’t easy to work with initially. Howeever once you get the hanfg odf it it is easy peasy. You can’t squish silica between your fingers as you can cotton, so you can’t thread a silica wick through a coil; you have to wrap the coil around the wick. Silica also doesn’t transport e-liquid quite as efficiently as cotton. If you use a silica wick for sub-ohm vaping, you’ll have to wait between puffs to let the wick re-saturate. While a silica wick isn’t a good choice for chain vaping, it’s worth considering if you prefer lower-temperature vaping, want the purest flavor possible or simply want a wick that can last an incredibly long time. So for thoise using a single coil atomizer at below 18 watts or so, it is a very good choice.

It is worth mentioning that Silica must be amorphous and not crystalline.
We don't want Silicosis.

There is thread that explains all the different types of wicks
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Thread-Wha...ilica+wick

Silica wick is not what i had in mind. I was thinking about glass wool.
Something like this:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-28-Grams-Py...0677.m4598
Silica wick seems like much thicker fibers. I have glass wool that is 6 micron fiber diameter...

The problem is it does not state if it is crystalline or amorphous. And it is 99% Silica. So it will not be flexible and will require you to wrap your coil around it. Why I mention crytalline is because it is known to cause silicosis. Wicking silica is amorphous.

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13-04-2019 11:47 PM
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Pcm81 Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(13-04-2019 11:47 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 09:50 PM)Pcm81 Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:36 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:53 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  Been watching a bunch of vaping videos, trying to educate myself on the subject. And I have to ask: Has anyone tried using the glass wool in place of the cotton in RDAs? In chemistry we use glass wool as filter for very corrosive liquids or reducing agents like KMnO4. Just seems like a more resilient and less likely to burn material than cotton...

What yal thinkin?

There is silica wicking. That is the Closest there has been. It has issues. Silica – not cotton – tused to be the most popular wick material for vaping. This is in thje pre-subohm era. Silica is even more neutral in flavor than cotton, and burning a silica wick is impossible at temperatures that a vaping device can reach. Since they don’t burn, silica wicks are extremely long lasting. Cotton ultimately overtook silica in popularity, though, for two reasons. The first is that silica isn’t easy to work with initially. Howeever once you get the hanfg odf it it is easy peasy. You can’t squish silica between your fingers as you can cotton, so you can’t thread a silica wick through a coil; you have to wrap the coil around the wick. Silica also doesn’t transport e-liquid quite as efficiently as cotton. If you use a silica wick for sub-ohm vaping, you’ll have to wait between puffs to let the wick re-saturate. While a silica wick isn’t a good choice for chain vaping, it’s worth considering if you prefer lower-temperature vaping, want the purest flavor possible or simply want a wick that can last an incredibly long time. So for thoise using a single coil atomizer at below 18 watts or so, it is a very good choice.

It is worth mentioning that Silica must be amorphous and not crystalline.
We don't want Silicosis.

There is thread that explains all the different types of wicks
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Thread-Wha...ilica+wick

Silica wick is not what i had in mind. I was thinking about glass wool.
Something like this:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-28-Grams-Py...0677.m4598
Silica wick seems like much thicker fibers. I have glass wool that is 6 micron fiber diameter...

The problem is it does not state if it is crystalline or amorphous. And it is 99% Silica. So it will not be flexible and will require you to wrap your coil around it. Why I mention crytalline is because it is known to cause silicosis. Wicking silica is amorphous.

It is very flexible. I have a pound of it. Literally feels like strong, silky cotton wool. In chemistry it is use to filter strong acids.

From worlds most unreliable source: wiki

Safety
Glass fiber has increased in popularity since the discovery that asbestos causes cancer and its subsequent removal from most products. However, the safety of glass fiber is also being called into question, as research shows that the composition of this material (asbestos and glass fiber are both silicate fibers) can cause similar toxicity as asbestos.[15][16][17][18]
1970s studies on rats found that fibrous glass of less than 3 μm in diameter and greater than 20 μm in length is a "potent carcinogen".[15] Likewise, the International Agency for Research on Cancer found it "may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen" in 1990. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, on the other hand, says that there is insufficient evidence, and that glass fiber is in group A4: "Not classifiable as a human carcinogen".
The North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) claims that glass fiber is fundamentally different from asbestos, since it is man-made instead of naturally occurring.[19] They claim that glass fiber "dissolves in the lungs", while asbestos remains in the body for life. Although both glass fiber and asbestos are made from silica filaments, NAIMA claims that asbestos is more dangerous because of its crystalline structure, which causes it to cleave into smaller, more dangerous pieces, citing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:
Quote:Synthetic vitreous fibers [fiber glass] differ from asbestos in two ways that may provide at least partial explanations for their lower toxicity. Because most synthetic vitreous fibers are not crystalline like asbestos, they do not split longitudinally to form thinner fibers. They also generally have markedly less biopersistence in biological tissues than asbestos fibers because they can undergo dissolution and transverse breakage.[20]
A 1998 study using rats found that the biopersistence of synthetic fibers after one year was 0.04–10%, but 27% for amosite asbestos. Fibers that persisted longer were found to be more carcinogenic.[21]
(This post was last modified: 14-04-2019 01:24 AM by Pcm81.)
14-04-2019 12:56 AM
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paulS Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(14-04-2019 12:56 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 11:47 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 09:50 PM)Pcm81 Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:36 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:53 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  Been watching a bunch of vaping videos, trying to educate myself on the subject. And I have to ask: Has anyone tried using the glass wool in place of the cotton in RDAs? In chemistry we use glass wool as filter for very corrosive liquids or reducing agents like KMnO4. Just seems like a more resilient and less likely to burn material than cotton...

What yal thinkin?

There is silica wicking. That is the Closest there has been. It has issues. Silica – not cotton – tused to be the most popular wick material for vaping. This is in thje pre-subohm era. Silica is even more neutral in flavor than cotton, and burning a silica wick is impossible at temperatures that a vaping device can reach. Since they don’t burn, silica wicks are extremely long lasting. Cotton ultimately overtook silica in popularity, though, for two reasons. The first is that silica isn’t easy to work with initially. Howeever once you get the hanfg odf it it is easy peasy. You can’t squish silica between your fingers as you can cotton, so you can’t thread a silica wick through a coil; you have to wrap the coil around the wick. Silica also doesn’t transport e-liquid quite as efficiently as cotton. If you use a silica wick for sub-ohm vaping, you’ll have to wait between puffs to let the wick re-saturate. While a silica wick isn’t a good choice for chain vaping, it’s worth considering if you prefer lower-temperature vaping, want the purest flavor possible or simply want a wick that can last an incredibly long time. So for thoise using a single coil atomizer at below 18 watts or so, it is a very good choice.

It is worth mentioning that Silica must be amorphous and not crystalline.
We don't want Silicosis.

There is thread that explains all the different types of wicks
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Thread-Wha...ilica+wick

Silica wick is not what i had in mind. I was thinking about glass wool.
Something like this:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-28-Grams-Py...0677.m4598
Silica wick seems like much thicker fibers. I have glass wool that is 6 micron fiber diameter...

The problem is it does not state if it is crystalline or amorphous. And it is 99% Silica. So it will not be flexible and will require you to wrap your coil around it. Why I mention crytalline is because it is known to cause silicosis. Wicking silica is amorphous.

It is very flexible. I have a pound of it. Literally feels like strong, silky cotton wool. In chemistry it is use to filter strong acids.

From worlds most unreliable source: wiki

Safety
Glass fiber has increased in popularity since the discovery that asbestos causes cancer and its subsequent removal from most products. However, the safety of glass fiber is also being called into question, as research shows that the composition of this material (asbestos and glass fiber are both silicate fibers) can cause similar toxicity as asbestos.[15][16][17][18]
1970s studies on rats found that fibrous glass of less than 3 μm in diameter and greater than 20 μm in length is a "potent carcinogen".[15] Likewise, the International Agency for Research on Cancer found it "may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen" in 1990. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, on the other hand, says that there is insufficient evidence, and that glass fiber is in group A4: "Not classifiable as a human carcinogen".
The North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) claims that glass fiber is fundamentally different from asbestos, since it is man-made instead of naturally occurring.[19] They claim that glass fiber "dissolves in the lungs", while asbestos remains in the body for life. Although both glass fiber and asbestos are made from silica filaments, NAIMA claims that asbestos is more dangerous because of its crystalline structure, which causes it to cleave into smaller, more dangerous pieces, citing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:
Quote:Synthetic vitreous fibers [fiber glass] differ from asbestos in two ways that may provide at least partial explanations for their lower toxicity. Because most synthetic vitreous fibers are not crystalline like asbestos, they do not split longitudinally to form thinner fibers. They also generally have markedly less biopersistence in biological tissues than asbestos fibers because they can undergo dissolution and transverse breakage.[20]
A 1998 study using rats found that the biopersistence of synthetic fibers after one year was 0.04–10%, but 27% for amosite asbestos. Fibers that persisted longer were found to be more carcinogenic.[21]

If you decide to use it let us know how efficiently it wicks!

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14-04-2019 03:37 AM
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Pcm81 Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(14-04-2019 03:37 AM)paulS Wrote:  
(14-04-2019 12:56 AM)Pcm81 Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 11:47 PM)paulS Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 09:50 PM)Pcm81 Wrote:  
(13-04-2019 02:36 PM)paulS Wrote:  There is silica wicking. That is the Closest there has been. It has issues. Silica – not cotton – tused to be the most popular wick material for vaping. This is in thje pre-subohm era. Silica is even more neutral in flavor than cotton, and burning a silica wick is impossible at temperatures that a vaping device can reach. Since they don’t burn, silica wicks are extremely long lasting. Cotton ultimately overtook silica in popularity, though, for two reasons. The first is that silica isn’t easy to work with initially. Howeever once you get the hanfg odf it it is easy peasy. You can’t squish silica between your fingers as you can cotton, so you can’t thread a silica wick through a coil; you have to wrap the coil around the wick. Silica also doesn’t transport e-liquid quite as efficiently as cotton. If you use a silica wick for sub-ohm vaping, you’ll have to wait between puffs to let the wick re-saturate. While a silica wick isn’t a good choice for chain vaping, it’s worth considering if you prefer lower-temperature vaping, want the purest flavor possible or simply want a wick that can last an incredibly long time. So for thoise using a single coil atomizer at below 18 watts or so, it is a very good choice.

It is worth mentioning that Silica must be amorphous and not crystalline.
We don't want Silicosis.

There is thread that explains all the different types of wicks
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Thread-Wha...ilica+wick

Silica wick is not what i had in mind. I was thinking about glass wool.
Something like this:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-28-Grams-Py...0677.m4598
Silica wick seems like much thicker fibers. I have glass wool that is 6 micron fiber diameter...

The problem is it does not state if it is crystalline or amorphous. And it is 99% Silica. So it will not be flexible and will require you to wrap your coil around it. Why I mention crytalline is because it is known to cause silicosis. Wicking silica is amorphous.

It is very flexible. I have a pound of it. Literally feels like strong, silky cotton wool. In chemistry it is use to filter strong acids.

From worlds most unreliable source: wiki

Safety
Glass fiber has increased in popularity since the discovery that asbestos causes cancer and its subsequent removal from most products. However, the safety of glass fiber is also being called into question, as research shows that the composition of this material (asbestos and glass fiber are both silicate fibers) can cause similar toxicity as asbestos.[15][16][17][18]
1970s studies on rats found that fibrous glass of less than 3 μm in diameter and greater than 20 μm in length is a "potent carcinogen".[15] Likewise, the International Agency for Research on Cancer found it "may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen" in 1990. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, on the other hand, says that there is insufficient evidence, and that glass fiber is in group A4: "Not classifiable as a human carcinogen".
The North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) claims that glass fiber is fundamentally different from asbestos, since it is man-made instead of naturally occurring.[19] They claim that glass fiber "dissolves in the lungs", while asbestos remains in the body for life. Although both glass fiber and asbestos are made from silica filaments, NAIMA claims that asbestos is more dangerous because of its crystalline structure, which causes it to cleave into smaller, more dangerous pieces, citing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:
Quote:Synthetic vitreous fibers [fiber glass] differ from asbestos in two ways that may provide at least partial explanations for their lower toxicity. Because most synthetic vitreous fibers are not crystalline like asbestos, they do not split longitudinally to form thinner fibers. They also generally have markedly less biopersistence in biological tissues than asbestos fibers because they can undergo dissolution and transverse breakage.[20]
A 1998 study using rats found that the biopersistence of synthetic fibers after one year was 0.04–10%, but 27% for amosite asbestos. Fibers that persisted longer were found to be more carcinogenic.[21]

If you decide to use it let us know how efficiently it wicks!
If i decide to try it, i'll post results. Was hoping someone already tried it before and could tell me if its worth even trying... I don't smoke or vape; building a vape for my GF to help her quit smoking; hence kind of hesitant to experiment... Might have to get some nicotine free juice and just test it myself in a dripper first...
14-04-2019 03:49 PM
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gentlydoingit* Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Cotton vs glass?
You hold the opinion that if you inhale glass fibre it will not cause cancer.. while omitting the fact that there could be multiple other problems it may cause. 

All of PaulS observations were and are correct. 

The status quo is very much more than adequate, silica wicks are a thing but cotton is way more popular. If you wish to experiment that's fine, Paul has pointed out the dangers and that's as much as any of us can do.

Don't forget to apply for the freecycle section!
http://www.thevapingforum.com/Forum-FreeCycle--191
14-04-2019 05:25 PM
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Post: #9
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(14-04-2019 03:49 PM)Pcm81 Wrote:  I don't smoke or vape; building a vape for my GF to help her quit smoking; hence kind of hesitant to experiment... Might have to get some nicotine free juice and just test it myself in a dripper first...

So you vape or you don't? Testin' is Vapin', after all.
14-04-2019 06:52 PM
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Pcm81 Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Cotton vs glass?
(14-04-2019 06:52 PM)TinWhisker Wrote:  
(14-04-2019 03:49 PM)Pcm81 Wrote:  I don't smoke or vape; building a vape for my GF to help her quit smoking; hence kind of hesitant to experiment... Might have to get some nicotine free juice and just test it myself in a dripper first...

So you vape or you don't? Testin' is Vapin', after all.
I am setting up a vape for my lady friend to help her quit smoking, but i myself am neither a smoker nor a vaper; I am just a nerd, which is why i am hesitant to experiment since most use won't be in my lungs...
14-04-2019 09:19 PM
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